Educational Leadership Reflection 12.5.14

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Here’s my third and final essay for this semester at SCSU.  If it helps you or anyone working to enter educational leadership, feel free to share.  Thanks!

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Milestones of the Personalized Internship Project

Introduction

This week marks a major milestone of my Personalized Internship Project (PIP). I worked with my English Language Arts (ELA) team and department supervisors to develop a workshop on protocols for looking at student work, which I rebadged Learning from Student Work (LSW). I assumed responsibility for running the workshop with support from my team. The workshop went well, and I received positive feedback from attendees. Furthermore, my supervisors wrote an e-mail thanking me for my efforts and commending me to the superintendent.

How the Experience Contributed to My Understanding of Leadership

Working with my team and supervisors over the past few months was rewarding and productive. The workshop was the culmination of our collaboration so far, and it was a rewarding experience. Much of my experience so far could be described as learning about leadership. Running the workshop could be considered the actual work of leadership, as I introduced some new concepts to teachers and guided them to begin to make changes in their practice. What I have not studied or experienced to a great degree so far is the edification and camaraderie shared by leaders working together when completing a project. It reminds me of how I feel when a classroom lesson goes well, and reflecting on it is always instructive and satisfying. Leadership studies do not do the emotional and psychological aspects of completed leadership objectives justice. Success breeds success, and I hope to continue to improve my skills and capacity to lead. Continue reading

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How to Implement Rigorous and Relevant ELA Curriculum Part Two

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My third semester of educational leadership is winding down, and that means I can use more of my summer vacation for blogging about things OTHER THAN EDUCATION!  If you’re still with me, though, here’s a follow-up to my last post about implementing rigorous and relevant ELA curriculum.  Enjoy, and please let me know what you think in the comments. – Bill

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How to Implement Rigorous and Relevant ELA Curriculum

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Leaders often look to best practices, scholarship, and other leaders before making changes in their organizations. However, much of my coursework in educational leadership has called on me to look to myself for answers. I find this to be valuable, as I do not yet have years of leadership experience to ponder; it does me good to envision how I will meet the inevitable changes and challenges I can expect when I assume a formal leadership role. Though I have opportunities to reflect in my coursework, prior assignments required me to ground my reflection in research. This may seem contradictory because most of us self-reflect without considering others’ thoughts, but academia demands explanation enforced by citation.

This post, though, is a reflective narrative reflection, a metacognitive exercise—a record of my thinking about my thinking. And in this instance I will write my way through the problem of implementing a rigorous and relevant ELA curriculum. Here is how I understand the issue.

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Learning Theories and Leadership

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learning theory, educational leadership, carol dweck, james comer I wrote this short paper recently for a grad class in learning theory.  I hope it’s useful to those seeking information about the importance of learning theory for educational leaders.  Learning standards and theorists such as Carol Dweck and James Comer are discussed.

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How to Get Teachers to Stop Hating the Common Core

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The backlash against the Common Core among teacher is, at its essence, a leadership problem.

In Heifetz and Laurie’s near seminal “The Work of Leadership” the two leadership scholars start by explaining the difference between adaptive challenges (game-changers, challenges that enable positive growth) and technical challenges (business-as-usual type stuff that just needs to get done).

In general, it seems that CCSS and the challenges it presents are being approached as technical challenges by many school leaders. However, there is a tremendous opportunity to make them out to be adaptive challenges and to rally staff behind a common vision.

ccss, leadership, the work of leaders Continue reading

Leadership Self Improvement Plan

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leadership, improvement, education

It takes a lot of work to become a good leader!

Here’s an essay I wrote for one of my educational leadership classes at Southern Connecticut State University.  It ties together my study of communication skills, conflict resolution, and a few New Year’s Resolutions to boot.  If you enjoy the essay and find it useful, please let us know in the comments.  Thanks! – Bill

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How to Live Well After the Digital Revolution

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gc logo 8.14.11Here’s an essay I published on this site a few years ago when it first started.  It used to have it’s own separate page, but now that I’m redesigning the site it will be a linked post instead.  It could use some updated, but it still helps summarize what this blog used to be about, and where it will go in the future.  Enjoy! – Bill

PS – Thanks for your patience as I update Good Circuits to better reflect my own writing and thinking and to better invite you to join in the exploration of where technology and the humanities meet to make us better people!

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